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#1 jbuzz

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 03:38 AM

I'm sure I'm not the only one who likes reading. What books do you guys like/are you reading right now? I just finished The Picture of Dorian Gray. I loved it, Oscar Wilde's prose is crazy good and he's up there for quotables as well.


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#2 soulREBEL360

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 04:22 AM

From the Browder File: 22 Essays on the African American Experience by Anthony T Browder



#3 Beatronome

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 04:26 AM

I'm currently reading Wait Until Spring, Bandini by John Fante, just finished The Brotherhood of the Grape, also by him. I like how the man writes, just straight to the point, kind of like Bukowski, in fact I only learned about Fante because Bukowksi referenced him in some of his novels.



#4 Batou_84

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 08:47 AM

ha fante...read the Road to Los Angeles after it was suggested by a writing professor in college...random guy

 

most recently I was reading the Amiri Baraka Reader...



#5 James Frank.

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 08:48 AM

anybody ever read Salvador Dali's novel?

i haven't read a single word, but i had it checked out from the library for like a month so i feel connected to it anyway.


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#6 Bliss

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 09:45 AM

anybody ever read Salvador Dali's novel?

i haven't read a single word, but i had it checked out from the library for like a month so i feel connected to it anyway.

you mean his autobiography-story kind of book? Read that one, it was okay... depends if you like that weird stuff



#7 bamajoe

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 02:39 PM

ha fante...read the Road to Los Angeles after it was suggested by a writing professor in college...random guy
 
most recently I was reading the Amiri Baraka Reader...


If you're into Baraka you might like his lectures on Internet archive.

#8 Frankie lee

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 05:14 PM

Just finished A History of nearly everything. great book! Its pretty much science and science history. but written for the layman. Very readable.

Started reading a book on the French revolution. haven't been reading a lot of novels lately. need to.


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#9 GC90

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 05:18 PM

http://en.wikipedia....e-faced_Messiah

Very interesting book, crazy how much shit you could get away with/make up in the first half of the 20th century. Actually pretty impressed with L Ron Hubbard's ability to scam pretty much everyone his whole life lol . Not done with it yet, about half way in but def interesting reading.

#10 The Jackal

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 05:40 PM

I just finished Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami like a month ago. I dug it, but not my favorite Murakami so far. Right now I'm reading Heart of Darkness. Never got to read this in high school, and I'm a huge fan of Apocalypse Now... It's alright so far, hasn't really captivated me yet. 



#11 James Frank.

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 06:54 PM

you mean his autobiography-story kind of book? Read that one, it was okay... depends if you like that weird stuff

 

it's called Hidden Faces i think.



#12 jbuzz

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 07:08 PM

I just finished Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami like a month ago. I dug it, but not my favorite Murakami so far. Right now I'm reading Heart of Darkness. Never got to read this in high school, and I'm a huge fan of Apocalypse Now... It's alright so far, hasn't really captivated me yet. 

 

The best part of Heart of Darkness is basically the last 30 pages when he meets Kurtz. I loved that book last time I read it. As for Murakami, I really dug Norwegian Wood (which I gather is entry level stuff for him) so I have to check the rest out.

 

I started On the Road last night too... I have a massive pile of 'essential reading' shit next to my bed like Capote and Dostoyevski to get through, as well as all the civil/workers rights texts from my American Studies unit at Uni, and Kant and Hume and shit for Philosophy. I wouldn't say I'm broadly read (yet), but I've got a lot of the canon down and I definitely prefer fiction to non-fiction.



#13 EdTheYounger

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 10:04 PM

I never really read up until about 3 years ago when I made a challenge to myself that I had to read at least 1 book per week for 12 months... I did it. It was goddamn painful at some points but I pushed through and it was totally worth it in the end. Some highlights from (and since then) would be:

 

As a man thinketh - James Alan

A short history of nearly everything (as mentioned) - Bill Bryson

1984 - George Orwell

Animal Farm - George Orwell

Letters from a stoic - Seneca (seneca is actually where my handle/name comes from... Seneca 'The younger' fun facts).

Meditations - Marcus Aurelius

Lying - Sam Harris

God is not great - Christopher Hitchens

Enders Game - Orson Scott Card

Steve Jobs - Walter Isaacson

Be Here Now - Ram Dass

Thus Spoke Zarathustra - Nietzsche

Surely you're joking Mr. Feynman - Richard Feynman

Exploring the world of lucid dreaming - Stephen LaBerge

Mans search for meaning - Viktor E. Frankl

anything by Alan Watts... Personal favorite is 'The Wisdom of insecurity' one of the only books to ever make me (almost) tear up.

DMT: The spirit molecule - Rick Strassman

Status Anxiety - Alain de Botton

Sex at dawn - Christopher Ryan

The happiness hypothesis - Jonathan Haidt (don't be fooled by the shitty name, this book is definitely in my top 5-3 books ever).

Godel, Escher, Bach - Douglas R. Hofstadter (excellent book to read while baked... but you'll probably never finish it. Joints like 800 pages and the material's dense AF!).

 

Currently reading:

The hero with a thousand faces - Joseph Campbell (another very good book to read while high)

When the body says no - Gabor Mate

Effortless Mastery - Kenny Werner (I recommend this one for pretty much everybody here... It's probably the best book on music I've read. Really changing my perspective on the creative process).

 

Sorry for the long post but they're all dope books!

 

Peace. 


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#14 JoaGymshoe

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Posted 09 April 2015 - 12:53 AM

...Peter F. Hamilton... one of science-fiction's finest imo...

 

...The Night's Dawn Trilogy...OMFWord!!

 

...The Reality Dysfunction (1996), The Neutronium Alchemist (1997), and The Naked God (1999).



#15 JoaGymshoe

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Posted 09 April 2015 - 01:05 AM

 I made a challenge to myself that I had to read at least 1 book per week for 12 months...

 

...Wow Ed!



#16 jbuzz

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Posted 09 April 2015 - 02:14 AM

Yeah dude that's fucking impressive



#17 EdTheYounger

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Posted 09 April 2015 - 02:35 AM

thanks dudes, I was pretty happy with my efforts. It was the first kinda "new years resolution" I ever really stuck with right through till the end... I was working a shitty office day job at the time and needed some inspiration and new perspectives on things (hence the abundance of non-fiction in my list). It works out to about 40 pages per day if the average book you read is around 200-300 pages. There were a couple of weeks where I'd miss a few days in a stretch and have to cram in a longer session or two. Towards Christmas in the last few weeks of December I just smashed out a few 100 pagers to scrape across the line :P I'd definitely recommend it to anyone looking to shake up their thought patterns a bit though. I'd say it changed my life for the best (without sounding to melodramatic).  

 

The only shit thing is when you get a bad book and feel like you have to stick it out just to finish 1 for the week lol.


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#18 Batou_84

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Posted 09 April 2015 - 06:32 AM

based off what others mentioned....haven't read it in a while but Hesse's Narcissus & goldmund was an interesting one if you can get through it...



#19 GC90

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Posted 09 April 2015 - 09:37 AM

I feel bad because growing up I'd read a million books, these days I'm doing good if I'm finishing like 3-4 a year lol . Trying to get in a better reading habit these days on the Kindle and whatnot. 
 
Def impressive you met your goal Ed!

Edit:
 

The only shit thing is when you get a bad book and feel like you have to stick it out just to finish 1 for the week lol.


This is what often stops me for months sometimes :( I hate just stopping a book completely, I end up just letting it sit forever until I want to read another book. I'll power through it then move on to more interesting one I actually want to read lol
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#20 jbuzz

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Posted 09 April 2015 - 05:51 PM

thanks dudes, I was pretty happy with my efforts. It was the first kinda "new years resolution" I ever really stuck with right through till the end... I was working a shitty office day job at the time and needed some inspiration and new perspectives on things (hence the abundance of non-fiction in my list). It works out to about 40 pages per day if the average book you read is around 200-300 pages. There were a couple of weeks where I'd miss a few days in a stretch and have to cram in a longer session or two. Towards Christmas in the last few weeks of December I just smashed out a few 100 pagers to scrape across the line :P I'd definitely recommend it to anyone looking to shake up their thought patterns a bit though. I'd say it changed my life for the best (without sounding to melodramatic).  

 

I had a friend who tried to do this and he stupidly put Infinite Jest in for the tenth week. That shit took him like 2 months to finish ahha



#21 bamajoe

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Posted Yesterday, 04:58 AM

Reading Brain Mechanic and Naruto vol. 1.

#22 jbuzz

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Posted Yesterday, 02:47 PM

I just finished On the Road. I was pretty underwhelmed tbh...



#23 Frankie lee

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Posted Yesterday, 07:47 PM

Didn't really do much for me either when I read it a couple years back. started Rabbit, Run the other day. I'm sure Updike is a better writer than Kerouac


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#24 jbuzz

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Posted Yesterday, 10:26 PM

Didn't really do much for me either when I read it a couple years back. started Rabbit, Run the other day. I'm sure Updike is a better writer than Kerouac

 

All my friends who are jazz musos tell me "it's THE book, man", but I don't really see how it really goes beyond hipsterism. I can see how it might've influenced Dylan and people of his generation mystique-wise, but literarily I don't think it's a masterpiece. I guess if you look at it more like a handbook to life it might be different though.



#25 l i f

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Posted Today, 05:34 AM

Just finished Ender's Game (on your list Ed..!) by Orson Scott Card. Took me all of three days to read (partly because a foot-injury kept me couch-bound most of last week, but   :P) ----> so, so good... heading to the library later to see if i can find the follow-up, Speaker for the Dead. 

 

 

First sci-fi novel i've read in a while... last one was Margaret Atwood's Oryx & Crake,  which is so, so good I've read multiple times times. 

 

 

More off your list - George Orwell is a must-read - and off the back of him then I recommend Anthony Burgess (Brave New World [edit: that's Aldous Huxley fool!] , Clockwork Orange etc) but a lesser-known of his "The End of the World News"  is a particular favourite.


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#26 EdTheYounger

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Posted Today, 05:40 AM

Just finished Ender's Game (on your list Ed..!) by Orson Scott Card. Took me all of three days to read (partly because a foot-injury kept me couch-bound most of last week, but   :P) ----> so, so good... 

I've actually boycotted ever watching the movie as to not sully my love and imagination of the book... 



#27 l i f

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Posted Today, 05:43 AM

Good call - I had a hard time not seeing Harrison Ford in my inner-vision-version... not a bad film by any means, but yeh... as a rule..



#28 GPBear

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Posted Today, 03:17 PM

A wikipedia quote by Dorothy Parker regarding her days in the Algonquin Table, "These were no giants. Think who was writing in those days - Lardner, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and Hemingway. Those were the real giants. The Round Table was just a lot of people telling jokes and telling each other how good they were. Just a bunch of loudmouths showing off, saving their gags for days, waiting for a chance to spring them... There was no truth in anything they said. It was the terrible day of the wisecrack, so there didn't have to be any truth..."

 

 

I look at twitter, instagram, status updates. And these words have never been more true. Society walked through a membrane in the 20th century, before then books were dense and valid, and now, they've become places to show off how clever of smart you can be.

 

 

My favorite poet/poetry is Ezra Pound and the Imagists, who were some of the first to start sparsing down their work from long metrical things to short more efficient forms of writing, but I think what society took from them was more of "We can write two sentence poems now" instead of "Learn how to edit yourself down to two sentences"






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