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#1 venkman

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 05:34 PM

This flip from Rock Konducta...

 

I see where the main sample came from but then when the whole melody/bass line and drums drop - that's not from the record. right? i mean.. it's ill. what would your process be if you were doing something like that?

 

Madlib playing it live

http://youtu.be/akhXYPnUSx8?t=38m16s 

 

Sample

http://youtu.be/4ognSTOADuY?t=14s



#2 SunnyMeadowz

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 07:40 PM

Holy Fuck.



#3 venkman

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Posted 04 March 2015 - 07:58 PM

I don't think I explained my question properly, considering your reply.

 

how about that – the question is about process. how it's done... (besides talent) 



#4 1stN3rd

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Posted Yesterday, 01:23 PM

This flip from Rock Konducta...

 

I see where the main sample came from but then when the whole melody/bass line and drums drop - that's not from the record. right? i mean.. it's ill. what would your process be if you were doing something like that?

 

Madlib playing it live

http://youtu.be/akhXYPnUSx8?t=38m16s 

 

Sample

http://youtu.be/4ognSTOADuY?t=14s

Alot of people think Madlib just flips songs – including myself. This was disproven though, when I heard his flip of Apostrophe by Frank Zappa, also on RK. He uses parts of that song, but then a string thing comes in that is nowhere in that song. My guess is that he has a library of "stock sounds" memorized and if he hears something that he thinks it would work over, he'll try to combine them. It's pretty ill, this is what Pete Rock and the Bomb Squad and older school cats did alot of, but then it went out of style once it became all about flipping one particular record. I think combining two different records can create that "holy shit" moment in a way that you can't do with just flipping one song. I did it recently on this track.

 

edit: nvm, in this case he just added drums and sub bass. standard procedure.


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#5 EdTheYounger

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Posted Yesterday, 03:17 PM

edit: nvm, in this case he just added drums and sub bass. standard procedure.

The thing with Madlib and a lot of other prominent sample based beat makers is they have a funny way of imparting their unique style on things in very simple basic ways. There's nothing out of the ordinary really. It's mainly just a good ear. One thing I notice in today's beat culture is dudes try to hard to do to much. I've been really enjoying dillas king of beats album lately (the old dirty unreleased shit). Sample, drums, bassline. Nothing crazy, what makes it enjoyable is the precision of the chops, the drum rhythm and the bass bounce. 3 things all done extremely well. Cats these days think there's some "trick" or some "technique" they're missing when they hear good beat makers. They go out of their way to learn all these "teqniques" and end up making over produced messy beats with heaps of unnecessary sounds piled on top of one another, crazy effects and flabby bass lines. like a restaurant with a 4 page menu but no good food. Learn the basics... Learn how to chop samples properly, learn how to lay down drums with rhythm and tune, learn how to make bass lines. That's all you need... That's all madlib needs.

Peace.

#6 venkman

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Posted Yesterday, 03:20 PM

Thanks for the thoughtful reply 1stN3rd :)

 

Yeah I think you might be right about combining two different records for that heavy change/drop, definitely something I want to work into my production arsenal! 

 

Checked out your track ~ was feelin' it. You definitely got your own style goin' there! keep on. 



#7 venkman

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Posted Yesterday, 03:26 PM

 imparting their unique style on things in very simple basic ways. 

Peace.

 

 

They keeps it simple – as well as complicated :)

 

Yeah I'm all about keeping it simple, but right now I need more practice. Keeping it simple isn't as easy as you'd think - in my case it sounds kinda empty. Thats why aI was interested in that melody that was on top of the bass & drums. 



#8 1stN3rd

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Posted Yesterday, 04:13 PM

The thing with Madlib and a lot of other prominent sample based beat makers is they have a funny way of imparting their unique style on things in very simple basic ways. There's nothing out of the ordinary really. It's mainly just a good ear. One thing I notice in today's beat culture is dudes try to hard to do to much. I've been really enjoying dillas king of beats album lately (the old dirty unreleased shit). Sample, drums, bassline. Nothing crazy, what makes it enjoyable is the precision of the chops, the drum rhythm and the bass bounce. 3 things all done extremely well. Cats these days think there's some "trick" or some "technique" they're missing when they hear good beat makers. They go out of their way to learn all these "teqniques" and end up making over produced messy beats with heaps of unnecessary sounds piled on top of one another, crazy effects and flabby bass lines. like a restaurant with a 4 page menu but no good food. Learn the basics... Learn how to chop samples properly, learn how to lay down drums with rhythm and tune, learn how to make bass lines. That's all you need... That's all madlib needs.

Peace.

Yeah I think one of the keys of creativity is knowing when to stop and leave it alone. Madlib's approach to that seems to be to just make tons of beats really quickly and edit everything down to the good bits. With Madlib you can kinda hear the effort and grit and imperfections that went into it. With Dilla though, it sounds effortless, like he was one of those freakish Mozart-types who was able to directly express his ideas. I go back and forth between which approach I prefer.

 

It's weird though, cuz there was this huge wave of people claiming to be influenced by Dilla right after he died from '06-'12 and then things swung in the opposite direction, like I hear people fronting on him all the time now. I just read in a youtube comment: "I think if Madlib had died he would easily be considered way better than Dilla. Dilla's shit is just like a loop and nothing special." It's cuz Dilla's style is so deceptively simple, dudes tried to emulate it and failed, so then they went instead with the EDM direction, fat drops and stacking twelve percussion loops and so on.


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#9 EdTheYounger

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Posted Yesterday, 04:49 PM

Exactly my sentiments. Or worse they start making what I call hip hop Muzak, it's almost so emulated, formulated and over done that all the emotion and feeling is zapped out and you're left with this stale peice of music. Like a buddy of mine says 'it's like hip hops version of ikea furniture'... People need to find their own style, I understand you get there and learn by imitation first but there has to be a moment when that falls away, some dudes just never achieve that...

Edit: how anyone can question dillas greatness is beyond me. He's the only hip hop artist who's music I've teared up to... Don't cry gets me choked pretty much everytime I hear it.
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#10 1stN3rd

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Posted Yesterday, 05:06 PM

Word. It's like FlyLo said: "Dilla sounded like he was having spiritual experiences while he was making his music."



#11 Grifty-Rodriguez

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Posted Yesterday, 07:08 PM

+1 dilla had this incredible touch and ear that just made his work soooo fucking soulful. +1 on shedding a tear too, the last track on donuts has made me cry tears of joy two times at least. I dig cats like ta-ku and stuff but I agree, some producers like him just get me bored like verse, chorus, "drop", bridge.....ad infinitum
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