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1980s-90s Electro/Techno


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#1 1stN3rd

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Posted Yesterday, 07:54 PM

So, I was checking out Drexciya, and that led me to a bunch of other artists and this dude's Youtube channel. Anyone else get into this shit? You can really see the roots of alot of modern hip-hop production like g-funk and trap with the use of the 808s and that dark undertone. But also, with the Detroit shit, you can hear how the sound influenced cats like Dilla and the Soulquarian folks with that smooth sound who took it in a whole nother direction.

 



#2 MWBOOGIE

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Posted Yesterday, 08:43 PM

So how is this innovative in your opinion?

#3 1stN3rd

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Posted Yesterday, 09:09 PM

Idk maybe I'm late to the party but it just sounds fresh me to me.

 

I think it has something to do with the fact that nowadays up-tempo hip-hop simply isn't done, but that was actually a major part of the genre for most of its history, so this kinda feels like a "missing piece of the puzzle" sort of thing.

 

 

It's that whole acid/electro thing. It got written out of history, but to me it's like the original source code for any hip-hop producer making a "creepy"-sounding beat.

 

Also, you have Drexciya and then you have the wider genre. I don't like everything I've heard in the genre, but I have yet to hear a Drexciya track that didn't impress me. 

 

edit: (just gonna keep on making edits on this post) There's a new guy out called Gesaffelstein who is doing a throwback on this kind of style...no wonder that Kanye tapped him for some productions on Yeezus, cuz Kanye's forward-thinking, and this is the kind of shit that we need.



#4 MWBOOGIE

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Posted Yesterday, 09:22 PM

Idk maybe I'm late to the party but it just sounds fresh me to me.

 
It's that whole acid/electro thing. It got written out of history, but to me it's like the original source code for any hip-hop producer making a "creepy"-sounding beat..

I was pretty fond of incorporating sped up beats, so I am glad that you clarified. I felt this necessary somewhat to enjoy golden area stuff-but I'm not someone so interested in the blend, particularly.

You'll have to work harder on the Kanye bit.

#5 1stN3rd

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Posted Yesterday, 09:27 PM

Just to add one more thing:

 

 

On this track for instance you can see how they have something in common with Dilla with those very subtle synth lines that sort of murmur and whisper in the background but never really materialize into a recognizable melody. That's a very Dilla touch that up til now I hadn't heard anyone else doing. An example of that in an entirely different context:

 

 

And what do mean work harder?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnrLXDYnS6c

 

You may not like Kanye, but name one other artist artist doing uptempo shit like this in this day and age (changeup notwithstanding).



#6 MWBOOGIE

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Posted Yesterday, 09:41 PM

Trap is not up tempo?

#7 1stN3rd

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Posted Yesterday, 09:47 PM

Eh, I guess it depends on your definition. With the modern trap production I think of it as double time, but basically still hovering around the usual tempos (someone correct me). But that whole triplet cadence that it seems like every rapper is utilizing wouldn't fit over the tempos I'm talking about.

 

I just remembered: Azealia Banks is also kinda doing this, and that's a better example than Kanye.

 

 

Incidentally, I'm surprised more people on here aren't fucking with her. She dropped an album that has more pound-for-pound rapping than probably anyone in the past few years (or at least anyone with her level of mainstream recognition). And she tapped a bunch of underground forward-thinking producers. More of a contemporary UK garage style, than electro, but it's part of the lineage that I'm talking about.



#8 MWBOOGIE

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Posted Yesterday, 10:24 PM

The beat is fine for an instrumental album, not really something that can be rapped over. I pretty much believe that a lot of music from 2000-2005 sounded like this, but have a feeling that You will tell me differently. Pretty sure that before there was Detroit-there were other places that were producing music in this genre/sub genre/sub-sub sub genre/what-have-you.

On the topic of rap-I hope her other songs don't sound like this. (She ain't saying shit-but I guess hip hop isn't supposed to conform to any standards in this day and age/and why is some guy from a radio station sampled on the track? If not for an ironic purpose?

But, thanks for the cut from the shining. I spent a good two weeks with a rental car in Europe and had that that in there the entire time. I agree that His collage was a derivation/but again, it is no different than what other ambient beatmakers were doing.

#9 1stN3rd

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Posted Yesterday, 11:21 PM

The beat is fine for an instrumental album, not really something that can be rapped over. I pretty much believe that a lot of music from 2000-2005 sounded like this, but have a feeling that You will tell me differently. Pretty sure that before there was Detroit-there were other places that were producing music in this genre/sub genre/sub-sub sub genre/what-have-you.

On the topic of rap-I hope her other songs don't sound like this. (She ain't saying shit-but I guess hip hop isn't supposed to conform to any standards in this day and age/and why is some guy from a radio station sampled on the track? If not for an ironic purpose?

But, thanks for the cut from the shining. I spent a good two weeks with a rental car in Europe and had that that in there the entire time. I agree that His collage was a derivation/but again, it is no different than what other ambient beatmakers were doing.

I agree that it's kind of dicey making these sorts of arguments since music is constantly evolving, so it's hard to pinpoint one specific artist or time period and say "this is where it all began." But, nonetheless, I do enjoy trying to connect the dots and make sense of it all, even though it's probably impossible. People talk about Dilla and Madlib so much because it's convenient, but there are probably other artists who made equal contributions but didn't get the same recognition (Kankick?).

 

It does seem that, as far as electro goes, there's a definite cutoff date, around 2005, when the music seems to get more computer-oriented, and I don't feel it nearly as much. Drexciya used straight drum machines and synths in a room, so it's a whole lot more legit (and expensive) than digital plugins. I just find their music to be really pure and deep. It gives me a feeling similar to when I was first getting into Dilla and Madlib, like the sound of someone who is totally lost in their own world, not doing it for fame or name.

 

 

As far rapping over a beat like this, see my whole thing is, I don't even really know what hip-hop is. Like I think a lot of the really great hip-hop from the 90s came from people not really knowing the "right" way to do things. Like they thought they were imitating an older style, but in fact they were doing something totally different. I feel that way about Illmatic, for instance. So I don't think hip-hop should be this set-in-stone thing, otherwise it's gonna end up like classic rock, just getting more watered down until it's utter shit. I mean, in a way, we're already there. The whole throwback, golden age backpacker thing, like those Clear Soul Forces guys...to me it just falls flat, for the same reasons I mentioned earlier. So I'm looking for lost potentials and trying to figure out "where the game has gone," so to speak.


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#10 MWBOOGIE

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Posted Today, 12:28 AM

I follow-never thought the day would come when we would be discussing the utilization of drum tracks and synths as a warmer sound-but that's a historical footnote and a mere aside. And I never received a memo, but I do know where you choose to go.

As for the rap stuff-well -live drums and instrumentation can alter the experience. Yes there should be reaching; a feeling of improvisation-agreed. But, at some point we reached the coffee house and forgive me as I was "a backpacker" and young jazz hound. That a label could locate and assemble a group fusing these styles shows that there may have been some format. But that's personal to me and an indication of where I cut my teeth or what I prized as fetish.

Anyway, I thought there was a conscious component to this thing at its core, regardless of which spiritual/ideological camp one ascribes to-even so-it's hard not to pay attention to how it's composed, especially if you desire the producers track to have character.

You say that You don't exactly know what hip-hop is and I can accept that; and I may be the type to fetishize to the fanboy level; however, it would be difficult to believe someone were they not to appreciate and recognize the following as containing both a personal and define-able style, thereby desiring that artistic quality that You mention in your last post: https://m.youtube.co...h?v=lpQM5IQ3F2s

It sounds like You've done a lot of producing for younger acts: and good luck getting them to sound more like what You are describing.

Judging from what I've seen out of my home base the mcs who saw their dreams go the way of the American dream are thoroughly interesting and I sure as shit offer support. Many did not care to sign for a major-mainly, because they were calling into question the power structure of the industry in the first place or plain trying to maintain their independent format. Nas did drink that bottle of Hennessy on someone's shelf-maybe he drank some Kool-aid to wash it down with? Sure there's a time to change, but there still is a formula if one expects to sell units. But here we are on ST and we've witnessed someone who is wildly successful, who hasn't been unnecessarily forced into change.
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#11 Jubito

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Posted Today, 04:09 AM

Jeff Mills, Derrick May, Juan Atkins (Cybotron) - just some of the names of the original Detroit techno scene...Underground Resistance was the name of Jeff Mills' collective, of which Drexciya was a part. Thank you D for giving us all these great artists!!!!!!!



#12 1stN3rd

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Posted Today, 02:31 PM

Yeah Madlib is def a pioneer, and he def fucks with the electro shit a lil bit, actually in a recent interview he said he was listening to a lot of industrial, which is another genre that I need to check out more. Supposedly an album is supposed to drop next year of his "future music," maybe without his name even being on it.

 

Anyway, more Drexciya:

 

 

I just can't get enough of this shit. Also, found some weird parallels between J Dilla and James Stinson, the main dude in Drexciya. Both named James. Both from Detroit. Both died at age 32.






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