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question about gemini turntable


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#1 shaolin disciple

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 02:19 PM

im not i dj and really dont know that much about turntables but i got a whole bunch of vinyl and no turntable so i figure i buy 1 can some body please give me some feedback on the turntable i might buy the good and bad things about them and if you could tell me if they play 10" records because i have some nice 10" records i want to play


the 2 turntables are

gemini tt-1000 turntable

gemini tt-01 turntable

i will appreciate any info thanks

#2 DAWHUD

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 04:09 PM

It depends on if you're wanting to just use it for listening or DJing. If you're wanting to do some cuts, don't get it and save up for a Technics. If you're just wanting to listen and chill, it's decent. Get a nice needle and chill. (I suggest a Sure M44-G for audiofile chillin'... M44-7 for cuts) And you should be fine with 10" records.

#3 shaolin disciple

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 09:09 PM

peace.....i think im going to go with the gemini tt-01 but thanks for the info

and the reason why i asked about the 10" record is because it says its plays 33 and 45 and nothing about 10" records i know im probaly going to sound stupit but i rather be safe then sorry what speed do i put it on when i play 10" record???


thanks

#4 E.Powers

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Posted 19 September 2012 - 09:51 PM

10" records may have been pressed at either speed, and of course 78's are 10"s as well. Read the label, the speed is probably on the label, but most will be played at 33. All decks will play 10"s, so don't stress that fact.

#5 shaolin disciple

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 11:13 AM

http://djproaudio.co...roducts_id=1048 can some 1 please click on the link and tell me if this turntable is better then the 2 gemini turntables i was talking about


thanks for any info


wish i had money for some technics but dont got that kind of money there all like 1000 dollars and up i just want a turntable that go to play my records good the quilaty sound of the turntable sound good will this turntable do that because i heard some bad things about them 2 turntables gemini i was talking about



peace

#6 DAWHUD

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 03:54 PM

That's basically along the same lines as the Gemini joints. It's you're call homie and in the long run are you going to want to get Techs or want to do cuts? If not, then go with a belt drive joint.

#7 shaolin disciple

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 04:02 PM

peace thanks for the info on that i will probably just go with the gemini tt-01 then and peace to all the dj out there i tryed to dj back in 95 when my boy got a dj set was really never any good at it mcing was alway my thing

good looking out

peace

#8 scojo

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 01:38 PM

If you're not looking to DJ, you're better off looking for a vintage deck at that price point. There are lots of old Dual, Thorens, Pioneer, etc turntables that you can pick up around that price point that will be light years beyond a Stanton or Gemini. Plus, a vintage turntable will likely offer better upgrade paths in the future - you can swap out the cartridge for a better model later and completely transform the sound without getting an entirely new table. Plus, vintage turntables look cooler.

One thing to keep in mind: if your receiver doesn't have a phono input, you'll need to purchase a phono stage (aka phono pre-amp) to get the sound loud enough for a standard RCA AUX jack.




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