Jump to content


Photo

recording to tape


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 josh

josh

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 145 posts

Posted 08 February 2007 - 10:25 PM

my mixer has rca inputs labeled "master rec" right under the master in which im guessing you can plug a tape deck's rca's to.

currently my tapedeck is connected to my receiver

im wondering if there will be any sort of difference, particularly in sound quality, if i connect my tapedeck to the master record on my mixer and record from there rather than record from my receiver.

#2 scabs

scabs

    Facebook.com/scabsallover Scabsallover.bandcamp.com

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,041 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Orange County
  • Interests:Ableton9, APC40, & Monome 40h

    Superlative Records
    Zypher Un Label
    Keep Records
  • Soundcloud:www.soundcloud.com/scabsallover

Posted 08 February 2007 - 11:40 PM

tape can deliver a deeper, lusher range in sonic quality, but subsequently you get the DREADED tape hiss. I have ways of minimizing it but it requires hours of tedious tuning and sonic sacrificing. trust me, for recording: BUY YOURSELF A MINIDISC OR a MULTITRACK

#3 josh

josh

    Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 145 posts

Posted 09 February 2007 - 11:56 AM

i have a dolby nr switch on my tapedeck, im not too worried about getting the best quality tho its just for making personal tapes of my turntable mixes whatever, im just wondering if there'll be any difference if i record straight from my mixer or from my receiver.

#4 j303

j303

    STMB Official

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 897 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:n y c
  • Interests:soundnoir.net

Posted 09 February 2007 - 02:30 PM

my recipe when i used to record tapes.


i bought tdk high bias cro2. I used the cheapest tape deck out there. a Radio shack single deck with slectors for dolby noise reduction and cro2 selection. I would record with the chromiun dioxide selector on. I would not use the dolby noise reduction for playback or recording. i always felt dolby compressed the sound for analog tapes. I used the cassete cleaner for the tape deck heads about every 6 weeks. the blue one from radio shack.

By hooking up your mixer directly to your reciever the bass and treble will determine the sound quality of the tape for play back. older records needed more treble. new records were kept at the 12 o'clock position if it was mastered or pressed properly. I made sure to never let the levels bleed - in other words i kept the recording level usually at 0 or plus one. Once you find the right recording level that hiss should be virtually non existant.

your best bet is to experiment, but my recording technique for tapes has never let me down. it's tedious but the sound quality was lush and clear. that is until i played the tape too much. then the digital age came upon us....

good luck

#5 scabs

scabs

    Facebook.com/scabsallover Scabsallover.bandcamp.com

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,041 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Orange County
  • Interests:Ableton9, APC40, & Monome 40h

    Superlative Records
    Zypher Un Label
    Keep Records
  • Soundcloud:www.soundcloud.com/scabsallover

Posted 11 February 2007 - 01:31 PM

my recipe when i used to record tapes.
i bought tdk high bias cro2. I used the cheapest tape deck out there. a Radio shack single deck with slectors for dolby noise reduction and cro2 selection. I would record with the chromiun dioxide selector on. I would not use the dolby noise reduction for playback or recording. i always felt dolby compressed the sound for analog tapes. I used the cassete cleaner for the tape deck heads about every 6 weeks. the blue one from radio shack.

By hooking up your mixer directly to your reciever the bass and treble will determine the sound quality of the tape for play back. older records needed more treble. new records were kept at the 12 o'clock position if it was mastered or pressed properly. I made sure to never let the levels bleed - in other words i kept the recording level usually at 0 or plus one. Once you find the right recording level that hiss should be virtually non existant.

your best bet is to experiment, but my recording technique for tapes has never let me down. it's tedious but the sound quality was lush and clear. that is until i played the tape too much. then the digital age came upon us....

good luck

there you have it




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users